Publications, recordings and other outputs

An overview of what I have written and published (as sociologist) or recorded and released (as musician). Simply, all public "outputs" of my work. When technically feasible and legally possible, I will add full texts and, in respective parts of the musical section of this web, musical samples in mp3.
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KONOPÁSEK, Z. & SVAČINA, K. (2014): Siting the Nuclear Waste Repository in the Czech Republic: Twists and Turns Towards Technical Democracy. Working paper of the InSOTEC project (WP 2). Available at http://www.insotec.eu/publications/topical-reports

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We are going to present a story of a double turn: first, the turn toward deliberative procedures orchestrated by the implementer; this turn came after the initial period of expert driven decision making had led to public protests and failed. Second, we describe a turn back toward more authoritative and technocratic decision making after several-years long attempt at “technical democracy”, to use this famous term (Callon, Lascoumes & Barthe 2009), did not bring expected results quickly enough. While the former kind of turn appears relatively frequently in literature, often accompanied by an account of how subsequent deliberation brought about interesting results, the latter does not seem to be discussed too often – although similar failures may not be so rare. This could be related, among others, to the fact, that while the first kind of events documents the need to take “social aspects” of technology into account (and, eventually, an important role of social learning), telling about failing attempts at carefully orchestrated public dialogue (under the auspices of EU projects) complicates the point – which is what we would deliberately like to do in this case study; and by doing so we hope to join the discussion about the limits of participation and about how to “move beyond mere sloganizing over science and democracy”. We want to show that a misunderstanding about the meaning of the notion of “socio-technical” can be seen behind the described double turn. Socio-technical, at least as far as its STS origin implies, does not mean simply just adding a list of “social issues” to the technical agenda. Not in a way in which the two sets of aspects are kept apart, separated and hierarchically ordered as two different kinds of issues to be solved in different spaces and times. And not in a way which is simply based on gathering experts and lay people together so that they may speak to each other and therefore constitute a kind of “socio-technical” discourse. Instead (and in accordance to the work done within STS), the notion of socio-technical refers to analytical determination to approach and understand social and technical processes together, as a single network, i.e., going hand in hand, inseparably (i.e., Callon 1991; Latour 1991 and elsewhere). Something like this, of course, is hard to translate into policy practices and formalized public involvement – which is valid even more for policy cultures that have remained practically untouched by “the emerging interest in scientific citizenship today and multiple new forms of public participation in science and technology” and in which scientific expertise still very much enjoys the status of politically neutral authority, external to societal life. In a way, we are convinced that the siting process in the Czech Republic has fallen victim to the simplified understanding of what “socio-technical” means for technical democracy in the making.

V/A (2014): Hody hody chorovody (His Voice Sampler). CD. Hudební informační středisko o.p.s.

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"Four years after Znění z mezí here comes Hody hody chorovody, another editoral compilation of what has recently drawn our attention from the fragmented Czech scene of experimental and alternative music" (HIS Voice 6/2013, p. 4).

KONOPÁSEK, Z. (2013): Sociologie, na které ne/záleží. [Sociology made ir/relevant]. Zdenek Konopasek's blog, January 29, 2013. Available at http://zdenek.konopasek.net/index.php?m=16&b=16&i=2757

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KONOPÁSEK, Z. (2013): Simulakrum jako nadávka? [Simulacra as a bad name?]. Zdenek Konopasek's blog, January 29, 2013. Available at http://zdenek.konopasek.net/index.php?m=16&b=16&i=2728

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SVAČINA, K. & KONOPÁSEK, Z. (2012): Identifying remaining socio-technical challenges at the national level: Czech Republic. Working paper of the InSOTEC project (WP 1 – MS 4). Available at http://www.insotec.eu/publications/file-cabinet

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This report describes the history, recent developments and the current situation of the management of highly radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in the Czech Republic, with a particular focus on the development of geological disposal for this kind of waste. Special attention is given to the interplay of social and technical aspects of the process. The first chapter gives an overview of the state of affairs and sketches out the trajectories leading to it. The institutional background, legislative framework and relevant government policies, as well as the role of affected communities and other civil society stakeholders are considered. The second chapter tries to identify the main socio-political challenges that the process of geological disposal development is currently facing. By socio-political challenges we mean problems and obstacles that complicate the negotiations between the implementer and other relevant groups, be it other state institutions, municipalities, or NGOs. The third chapter takes these observations a step further, and tries to identify significant socio-technical challenges within this process. By looking at the problems as socio-technical, we want to emphasize and highlight the fact that there is interplay of social and technical aspects, and that it is often problematic or counterproductive to consider them as separate, purely social and purely technical aspects. The ultimate goal of identifying significant socio-technical challenges then is to sketch out problems of interest for case study research in the second work package of InSOTEC.

KONOPÁSEK, Z. (2011): Aby se pracovalo pěkněji: ATLAS.ti, verze sedmá [Making the interface nicer and more workable: ATLAS.ti, v7]. Biograf (56): 91-109

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KONOPÁSEK, Z. / PALEČEK, J. (2012): Apparitions and possessions as boundary objects: An exploration into some tensions between mental health care and pastoral care. Journal of Religion and Health, 51 (3): 970-985

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Apparitions and possessions can be taken as genuine spiritual events or as symptoms of psychopathology. We focus upon occasions when the two seemingly conflicting “interpretations” co-exist in order to explore these phenomena as a kind of boundary objects – polymorphous realities stable and graspable enough, yet belonging to different worlds at once. Related diagnostic knowledge is often uncertain and always incomplete. Yet it enables authoritative and effective professional interventions. We conclude by discussing the relevance of such a view for contemporary efforts to validate patients’ spiritual experiences within mental health care.

KONOPÁSEK, Z. (2011): Je prý třeba změnit ten postoj a ptát se... [The attitude has to be changed and questions asked, he says]. Zdenek Konopasek's blog, February 26, 2011. Available at http://zdenek.konopasek.net/index.php?m=151&i=1871&b=151

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KONOPÁSEK, Z. (2011): Das Denken mit ATLAS.ti sichtbar machen: Computergestützte qualitative Analyse als textuelle Praxis. In: G. Mey & K. Mruck, eds.: Grounded theory reader. 2nd updated and extended edition. Wiesbaden: VS Verlag. Pp. 381-403

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How is a new quality of reading, which we call "sociological understanding", created during the process of qualitative analysis? A methodological (conventional) answer to this question usually speaks of mental processes and conceptual work. This paper suggests a different view—sociological rather than methodological; or more precisely a view inspired by a contemporary sociology of science. It describes qualitative analysis as a set of material practices. Taking grounded theory methodology and the work with the computer programme Atlas.ti as an example, it is argued that thinking is inseparable from doing even in this domain. It is argued that by adopting the suggested perspective we might be better able to speak of otherwise hardly graspable processes of qualitative analysis in more accountable and instructable ways. Further, software packages would be better understood not only as "mere tools" for coding and retrieving, but also as complex virtual environments for embodied and practice-based knowledge making. Finally, grounded theory methodology might appear in a somewhat different light: when described not in terms of methodological or theoretical concepts but rather in terms of what we practically do with the analysed data, it becomes perfectly compatible with the radical constructivist, textualist, or even post-structuralist paradigms of interpretation (from which it has allegedly departed by a long way). (Translated to German and reprinted from Historical Social Research 2007/FQS 2008)

Zátory (2011): Zátory. CD. Polí5 [EPP 027-2]

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Zátory, the least known legend of music rooted deeply in 1970's, but performed in the midst of the first decade of the millennium. The band was headed by Vladimír Línek, the veteran of alternative music, who has, among others, collaborated with Mikoláš Chadima. This is a post-mortem compilation of home-recorded songs.
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Jindřich Tolar (voc, guitars), Michal Fejt (voc, bass), Karel "Maso" Koštejn (voc, drums) & Zdeněk Konopásek (drums) - voila, two drummers on stage. Garden party between Zadní Třebaň a Liteň. Together with: Apačí.

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